Skip to main content

3 posts tagged with "satis"

View All Tags

This blog post might be outdated!
This blog post was published more than one year ago and might be outdated!
· 2 min read
Stephan Hochdörfer

In our "old" Jenkins set-up things were simple: The Jenkins master and Satis were running on the same host thus Jenkins could easily invoke Satis via a command-line call. Unfortunately GitLab does not allow that. The only option which is currently available in GitLab is to trigger Satis via a webhook. Neither Satis itself or Satisfy which we actually use provide support for webhooks. Thus we extended Satisfy with a simple controller which invokes the Satis cli command. Definitely not the best solution but it works for us.

This blog post might be outdated!
This blog post was published more than one year ago and might be outdated!
· 2 min read
Stephan Hochdörfer

Since we have to deal with a lot of private packages which cannot be shared on packagist I set-up a private Satis repo. Whenever a new version of a package gets created the Satis build process is started by our Jenkins build server. In the last couple of months this process takes quite a while because Satis rebuilds the index for every repo it knows about. Since we deal with quite a few repos containing a large amount of versions it slowed down the "build time". Obviously it does not make any sense to run Satis on a repo that has not changed. Since Satis was lacking this feature I started hacking on it and I am happy that the feature got merged into master this morning. If you have to deal with large repos or a large number of repos you might want to give it a try.This is how things work: